Cuisinart DLC-10S Pro Classic 7-Cup Food Processor, White Review

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3 Comments on “Cuisinart DLC-10S Pro Classic 7-Cup Food Processor, White Review
  1. 667 of 687 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    After much research I purchased this model, December 27, 2010
    By 
    judy houck (St Paul, MN) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-10S Pro Classic 7-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
    I am a very analytical person that does not buy a product without extensive research. I first determined that for a two person household of empty nesters that the 7 cup food processor would be the ideal size. Smaller models do not offer the option of mixing bread dough or pizza dough and usually do not have slicing/shredding options. I also did not want to lift or be forced to clean a larger machine. Upon examination of 7 cup food processors I quickly found that the two brands most recommended by consumer research groups are the Cuisinart and the Kitchen Aid brands within my price point of around $100.00. Both of these models have good motors and are heavy enough not to move around on the counter while performing their functions.
    In comparing the two models I found that the weights and heights of the models are similar. Product reliability ratings are also similar. The Kitchen Aid gains points for appearing to be easier to clean and being slightly more attractive on my counter than the Cuisinart. The downside of the KitchenAid food processor was that the slicing blade that comes with the unit is a 2mm blade that slices food very thin. I concluded that the slices are too thin to use in my stir frys or pie baking without rendering the fruit or vegetable into a mush like state. The Cuisinart comes with a more functional 4mm blade that better meets my needs(It is important to note that you cannot buy other size blades or attachments for the 7 Cup KitchenAid model).I like it that I had the flexibility of purchasing other attachments in the future to perform other functions with the Cuisinart model.
    I purchased this particular model of the Cuisinart because unlike the newer model it came with an extra easy to clean lid, which you can utilize when using the main blade of the machine. This simiplar lid cuts your clean up time in half over using the more complex pusher lid, which is not easy to clean. (As a side note-always spray the blades with cooking spray before using the slicing and shredding discs to save on clean up time).
    I also found that you have more control with the slicing function in the Cuisinart model, due to the pusher assembly in the lid, than you do with the less complex mechanism in the Kitchen Aid model. After trying both models at home I also found that the mixing action was superior in the Cuisinart and that food had less chance of becoming lodged under the blade. So, I have kept the Cuisinart model and could not be happier with my recent Christmas gift to myself!

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  2. 959 of 997 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Useful for a number of chores in the kitchen–lousy warranty, December 26, 2003
    By 
    Joanna D. (USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (COMMUNITY FORUM 04)
      
    (#1 Hall OF FAME REVIEWER)
      
    (TOP 10 REVIEWER)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-10S Pro Classic 7-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
    Update: Well, that didn’t last long. The bowl broke at the handle (this is THIN plastic) and it’s right back of where the shaft interlocks into the top for safety. So essentially, the unit is useless until I get a replacement bowl. I wrote to the manufacturer. We’ll see how they respond to the three year warranty (and this is only after really five months of use, and not heavy use at that.) The “warranty” you have to send the bowl in at your expense AND return (that’s not cheap) so buying a new one with free shipping is exactly the same cost as shipping it to Cuisinart. But…you don’t have to wait. I deducted some stars from this review as a six month lifespan on a workbowl with a useless warranty is not very good.

    While I usually chop on a plastic cutting board with a big chef’s knife, the Cuisinart makes several tasks a lot easier. Chopping cooked or raw meat is one. If you are making hash from leftover corned beef, a short burst in this food processor is the easiest way to go. For mixing certain pastry doughs (pie or pate brisee) this is also a very good item to have, although you have to be careful to go slowly and not over-process.

    The one thing the Cuisinart does is heat up the dough if you whirl it around too much, so you have to be careful. And if you put too heavy a bread dough in, using the plastic bread blade, you can heat the shaft up enough to jam the blade onto the central post and that’s a big nuisance. However, with these cautions, the Cuisinart is hands-down my favorite food processor and for shredding, slicing thinly or chopping, pretty much the best kitchen appliance for the job.

    In particular, I like to make hummus and various vegetable soups like pea soup (from fresh peas.) These need to be blended, but I prefer the texture from the food processor over the stick blender on occasion. For example, if you are pureeing peas, and want to sieve them to remove the remnants of the skins, the food processor works well. Or if you want a less liquid consistency, the food processor has its advantages.

    They redesigned the Cuisinart over the original to have a wider feed tube. The blade plates are detachable from the stem (that’s different from the original from long ago as well, helps with storage.) I find the Cuisinart shreds and doesn’t mash the shreds or slices. This is a very useful, all-around workhorse in the kitchen, especially for vegetable foods and pastry dough. This is my favorite version of the food processor. It does the job.

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  3. 830 of 867 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Worthy of the Five Stars, December 31, 2010
    By 
    Floyd Ian Slipp (Naples, FL) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-10S Pro Classic 7-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
    I’m an enthusiastic amateur cook. Some might say I’m an advanced cook. Whatever.

    I’ve had a number of food processors over the years. Just a few factoids are pertinent here:

    * My first FP was an original Cuisinart 7-cup model. I just tossed it out because the bowl finally broke and I didn’t want to replace just the bowl at this point. Why? Because I bought the original over 30 years ago! In thirty years of hard use, only one minor part failure. I’d say that original was pretty durable.

    * There’s Cuisinart and there are ‘all others.’ In thinking over my experiences, I couldn’t bring myself to buy anything other than a Cuisinart. Especially after reading the numerous reviews on Amazon.

    So, I bought a new original — now called ‘Classic,’ like Coke — 7-cup model. And, like Coke, they’ve changed enough of the product design so that they couldn’t call it the ‘old’ Cuisinart. So it’s a ‘Classic.’ OK.

    What are the evolutions in the last 30 years and, more importantly, are they worth it? Here are the ones I can see:

    * The steel chopping blade — the workhorse of the unit — has changed slightly in its shape. This is no doubt for the best.

    * The switch is now a single, double-duty switch instead of two separate controls. One way for ‘constant on,’ and the other way for ‘pulse.’ An improvement, both in functionality and manufacturing cost.

    * The motor sounds different, presumably because it’s both better AND cheaper to make. Also, not having ripped the unit apart to see for myself, I believe that it’s also because the controls have been replaced with a solid-state switching mechanism. This is also for the better.

    * I’ve saved the best for last. Cuisinart has included in this model a bowl cover that is simply a flat plate with a hole in it that allows the user to simply drop, drip, or drizzle ingredients into the bowl at will, without having to juggle the three-piece feed tube arrangement. Now, the feed-tube system is lovely for slicing and shreeding, but it always requires cleaning each part every time it’s used. So this new, additional cover is a boon to the cook, who might well use it, as I do, about 90 percent of the time I use the processor. Thanks, Cuisinart. You’ve read my thoughts.

    Anyway, the device is also good for all the right reasons. It’s functional, well-designed, and well-made. It’s called ‘classic’ because it is. It’s stood the test of time for me and thousands of other customers.

    I expect to have this processor for the next 30 years. At that point, I’ll be 93 years old and probably require a juicer, not a food processor, to prepare my meals. The juicer will probably be a Cuisinart, too.

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